Our Loves. Wine & Food

What's On Your Cover

What's On Your Cover

Talking to your parents about anything was taboo for Gen X and a parents response was far greater than having a taboo experience. It was the next thing to death. We were the "Latchkey" generation with a "Whatever" mentality and wanted to have fun. I mean serious fun that didn't take a lot of thought and we had some in-depth life conversations about sh*t. We were on the brink/ beginning of dial-up internet so, online chatting was limited and since we didn't feel the need to talk to our parents about personal stuff we relied on our friends and magazines for guidance.

We idolized supermodels such as Cindy Crawford, Kate Moss, Noami Campbell, and Tyra Banks. They graced the pages and covers of magazines and had realistic bodies. We were aware we didn't have and never would achieve their height to be a supermodel but we could diet just enough to slightly resemble their bodies in a dress. Magazines such as Cosmopolitan, Glamour, and Allure were our go-to magazines about life. When you purchased a Cosmo in the 90's you felt good about yourself and worked on tweaking your entire look - not just painting your face, and the magazine would help us face our perception about ourselves, dating and men. Some of the articles in the magazine were about sex but it was not in every issue. The articles were modest and definitely not in the same context it is written today. They were not about a lot of Sex Moves, Orgasms, and Dominance. It was a magazine about being a true woman. Teenagers from the age of 15 and up read it because we wanted to see unique beauty and get tips on how to create the look. The articles were well written and not in slang. They were written with more intensity and mental perception rather than following the latest trend. Yet, the mentality of young teenagers and twenty-somethings were different. We just wanted a good laugh and enjoy life, but look good in the process. At the turn of the Century, Cosmo changed so did the mentality of women and my generation is partly to blame. My generation was reaching adulthood in the early 2000s and our attitude and expression for change included trying to figure out our identity and sexuality. We didn't want to and still don't want to go through life expressing every beautiful aspect of life as a taboo. As a result, the magazines my friends and I once bonded with as a young teenager into our twenties and turned to for guidance is now the movie, Pretty Woman meets Joan of Arc and they published a magazine together.

Over Two Decades of Cosmopolitan Magazine; Gen X, Gen Y and Gen Z of Cosmo.

Grunge: 1991 - 1993

Millennials: 2011 - 2013

Gen Z: 2018 - Today

No Sleep Beauty

No Sleep Beauty

5 Tips for Smoother Skin

5 Tips for Smoother Skin